Netflix

Romancing the Narco

Netflix is about to release the third installment in its wildly successful series “Narcos”, which began with the fantastic portrayal of Colombian drug kingpin Pablo Escobar by Wagner Moura, in a well-conceived, albeit, fictional narrative centering around the exploits of the Medellin cartel and the hapless DEA agents in pursuit of its infamous leader.

Blown Cover

The new season moves on chronologically and northward, to the mid 80’s in Mexico and the first case of a murdered agent of the DEA. Enrique “Kiki” Camarena was an anti-narcotics officer with the Drug Enforcement Administration working in Mexico under cover as a journalist. In the Winter of 1985, months before a devastating earthquake that would take thousands of lives in Mexico City, a member of the Guadalajara Group, got careless with the plans to kidnap him after his identity had been leaked to the criminal organization by an anonymous source in the American consulate located in the capital of Jalisco.

Camarena
File Photo: Enrique “Kiki” Camarena was tortured to death in Mexico by Rafael Caro Quintero in 1985.

Rafael Caro Quintero had been just another uneducated thug on the payroll of the drug trafficking group, but had risen quickly in the ranks as a result of his ambition and innovative marijuana cultivation methods. At that time, the organization was headed by Amado Carrillo Fuentes, a.k.a. El Señor de Los Cielos, who would later put together a fleet of aircraft to transport narcotics across the border. Quintero ran part of Carrillo Fuentes’ operation with fellow gang deputy, Ernesto Fonseca Carrillo or Don Neto. Together, they decided to teach the annoying DEA agent a lesson and scare him off.

The Look-Away

Camarena was abducted and hidden in one of the organization’s main properties in the city of Guadalajara. Business was booming. The covert Iran-Contra operation was in full swing, and American deep state actors had scaled the Mexican drug trafficking business considerably. Tons of Colombian cocaine were being smuggled into the United States via the Sinaloan desert, where U.S. military personnel swapped the weapons cargo they had flown in, destined for Nicaraguan Contras, with cocaine brought up from South America on its way to the streets of South Central Los Angeles and other points in the growing crack and coke market. It was not surprising then, that Caro Quintero felt he could get away with torturing a DEA agent to death.

Nevertheless, when Fonseca Carrillo, heard what Quintero had done, he was terrified. He personally went to see the agent’s mangled corpse while it was still in the safe house and went off on Quintero. What his partner didn’t understand was that the boss was not THE boss. There were higher-ups in the Mexican military and the federal government who would not be happy with this turn of events. Quintero’s rouge actions could jeopardize their positions. Indeed, Don Neto was soon convicted of the agent’s murder and is languishing in a Mexican prison to this day. As for Caro Quintero, he too was arrested and sent to prison, though released just a few years ago. The Guadalajara Group, however, would continue to thrive under new figureheads groomed by the real bosses behind the scenes and rebrand itself as the Sinaloa Cartel.

That’s Entertainment

The first two seasons of Narcos didn’t go very far down the rabbit hole of the deep state’s active involvement in the drug trade. At best, there were only some very subtle insinuations. But, nobody expects that to change as the series progresses. After all, there are “higher-ups” in nearly every industry and people, in general, like their heroes and villains to be clearly defined. Diego Luna is set to play the Lord of the Skies in the upcoming Netflix epic. If the Mexican actor is able to approach Moura’s gravitas from the first two seasons, then the show will be well worth the $9-dollar subscription price tag. But, don’t assume you’re going to get the real story about the drug war.

If you’re looking to be both informed and entertained, I would urge you to consider watching my series “Borderline – The Unhinged Truth About the Drug War”, currently half-way through its full release. Part I and Part II are out now, no subscription necessary.

Borderline – The Unhinged Truth About the Drug War

Is the war on drugs a failed policy or a vital tool of American hegemony?

Part I


A massacre in the northern Mexican state of Coahuila was unleashed by the most violent cartel in the country, the Zetas. As many as 300 people were murdered or kidnapped in 2011 by the mercenary drug army, but if it hadn’t been for the DEA, such a terrible tragedy might have never happened. Part one takes you on the ground of the deadliest war of our time, and sets the stage for the real story about the so-called war on drugs.

Part II


Part II takes a step back into history and looks at the roots of drug trafficking in America as well as the rise to power of the architect of the modern day “war on drugs”, George H.W. Bush, and the so-far unexamined, engineered crisis imposed on a rising Mexican economy three decades ago, which plunged it into the violence-ridden country it is today.

Part III


Part III begins with the collapse of the Somoza regime in Nicaragua and the creation of the world’s biggest illicit drug market in the United States via Iran-Contra by elements of America’s deep state. The policies and strategies employed by the military-industrial complex are then revealed in detail, as the political discourse of “national security” was continually used by both the Department of Defense and large U.S. multinational firms to impose hegemonic designs on Latin America and the world, with pharma giant Pfizer leading the way on the corporate front, and U.S. Southern Command (Southcom) assuming the lead role on the military front.

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